Updates

Highly recommend reading this if you use npm. It’s the text from a talk given at @JSConfEU@twitter.com on Saturday by @ceejbot@twitter.com. The story of how npm came to be is pretty intriguing if you don’t know it already, but the essay leads to a pretty interesting announcement: https://github.com/ceejbot/economics-of-package-management/blob/master/essay.md

TL;DR It’s a federated package registry for JavaScript. 😱 https://github.com/entropic-dev/entropic/

Also on: twitter.com

Why yes I am listening to the Lego Movie 2 soundtrack. How are you?

Also on: twitter.com

@tas50@twitter.com I’m counting down the days to when Lego is no longer a significant choking hazard for Teddie.

Also on: twitter.com

Keyboard enthusiasts! Halp! I’m looking at getting a new keyboard. I currently have Cherry MX browns, they’re fine. I’ve really enjoyed Cherry MX reds I tried on a friends keyboard. These are my options. Advice??

Also on: twitter.com

I sketched out my highlights and takeaways from @FrontendUnited@twitter.com. Lots to think about. Thanks to the organisers and amazing speakers! #FrontendUnited #sketchnotes

Frontend united day 1 highlights. "This is for everyone". "Focus on the problem, not the solution". "Unconcious bias". "Harmony is greater than unison". "Logic is more important than code". "Information cascade". "Mystery meat menu". "How do we make the web better for everyone?"
Frontend United day 2 highlights. "A little design friction helps embed personality". "Design is applied ethics". "Stylabilla". "Variable fonts". "Should I use flexbox or grid? Yes!". "Technology is not neutral". "Disability is not a health problem. It's a mismatch of human interaction".

Also on: twitter.com

My first go doing #scetchnotes! Thanks @Cennydd@twitter.com for the ideas and inspiration around technology and ethics. #FrontendUnited

Also on: twitter.com

Staaaaaaaap 😭

Also on: twitter.com, mastodon.social

It’s easy to forget that part of learning to code is learning how to even get a program running, which is often more confusing/frustrating than the code.
https://twitter.com/schmichael/status/1121823147118850048?s=21

I feel that environment knowledge is often discounted over programming knowledge. Using the command line, knowing how to install a program, knowing how to install dependencies, dealing with version control, and knowing how to debug all of the above, all of this is vital knowledge that’s hard to learn.

So yeah. If you’re learning to code and find this hard, well, it is! Be kind to yourself. Environments are unintuitive and fickle. We’ve all battled through this stuff and still do.

Also on: twitter.com

This is a big reason why I still use lodash or Ramda in a number of my projects. Clever code is rarely readable code. It feels good when you write it, but in a team working on production code readability is your no. 1 priority.

Javascript syntax has come a long way, but sometimes a utility library is still useful to abstract common patterns that would be verbose or unreadable with today's js syntax.

https://gomakethings.com/clever-javascript-does-not-mean-simple-or-readable/

Clever JavaScript does not mean simple or readable

Clever JavaScript does not mean simple or readable

Last week, someone tweeted: Woah, this is elegant JavaScript. Need to conditionally add a property to an object? Here’s a slick approach. The right-hand side is only applied if the condition is true. If the condition is falsy, the spread operator does nothing. They shared this code snippet from an article by Andrea Simone Costa: const obj = { ...condition && { prop: value }, }; This is not a dig at Andrea.

gomakethings.com

Also on: twitter.com, mastodon.social

Really excellent insights from @KimCrayton1@twitter.com on the @StackOverflow@twitter.com 2019 Developer Survey. Please watch!

Also on: twitter.com